Amethyst

If you are shopping for an amethyst ring then you will be drawn by its subtly seductive color. Amethyst is a striking stone in violet and purple. It’s the purple variety of quartz. Amethyst is said to have stress-relieving properties with healing properties that remove negative energy. For a long-long time, amethyst has been one of the most striking stones from the quartz family and it has adorned the thrones and crowns of prince and princess, alike. The great Moses said that it is the symbol of the Spirit of God. Its name was derived for the Greek word ‘amethystos’ meaning not intoxicated. The amethyst is the birthstone of those who were born in the month of February. Over the centuries, many faiths and beliefs have been formed around this magical stone. Some say that it can protect your crops against locusts and storm while others believe that it will bring good fortune in war, destroy evil spirits and enhance the intellect. Those are man-made beliefs but gemstone therapists have a different view. They believe that this magnificent stone can have a cleansing effect on the wearer. In the early ages, amethyst was mostly worn by bishops and cardinals. The hardness of this stone is 7 on the Moh’s scale, and it permits moderate refraction but its crystal structure is most unconventional. The crystal structure construction of the amethyst is stratified and due to this, you will find certain lamellae and areas having varying color intensity. If you come across a large cut amethyst then you will find that the color is not uniform across the stone. Scientists owe this variation in color to certain iron constituents that are connected to the natural radioactive radiation. Amethyst also changes its color when heated and it can become yellow or colorless when heated at 400 degrees. There are few rare incidents where people have found bi-colored amethyst and this has been named ametrine. There are some amethysts that will turn pale or colorless in broad daylight. Although the reason behind this phenomenon still eludes scientists you can re-color your amethysts by using radium radiation. Since amethyst can lose its color, it’s advised that amethyst jewelry should not be worn while sunbathing or when you are in a solarium. Apart from the sunlight, even extreme change in temperatures can cause damage to the stone. The biggest deposit of amethysts has been found in Brazil and Uruguay. The third country that has amethysts deposit in Madagascar. The largest cavity of amethyst was discovered in the Rio Grande do Sul in 1900. Diggers found dark violet amethysts that were as big as an adult fist and weighed almost 700 cwt. Today, as compared to diamonds, ruby, and sapphire, the cost of amethysts is much lower but that doesn’t mean it is any less precious. The amethyst is not just another stone, it is a beautiful part of nature. Image...

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Gemstones have been sought after and treasured throughout history. They have been found in ruins dating several thousand years. They are valued as gifts symbolizing love. Generally, the price of any gemstone is determined by: size, cut, quality (color/clarity/treatments), and type. Here are some questions to ask about quality: Has it been treated? Is the stone natural or synthetic? Are there any noticeable scratches, chips or inclusions? Is the color even throughout the stone? How good is the color? (Is it vivid?) If you are buying the stones for earrings or cufflinks, are the stones well matched? There are many ways that dealers treat gemstones. The savvy buyer asks lots of questions and hopefully tests the results. Here are some treatments to look for: Irradiation: It is common to irradiate Aquamarine, London Blue Topaz, Emerald, and Diamond as well as other stones. This treatment brings out color and removes imperfections. Many dealers know if the stones they are selling have been irradiated. Honest ones will tell you if they are aware of the treatment. Heat Treatment: Amethyst, Aquamarine, Ruby, Tanzanite and Topaz are often heated at high temperatures to enhance color. Dye: This is the most common treatment used. On clear stones, dye may be visible in cracks that are darker than the rest of the stone. Sometimes dye appears as a residue that rubs off or white patches. Lapis and Rose Quartz are commonly dyed. Amethyst and Citrine are often dyed. Black Onyx is permanently dyed in normal processing. Coatings: Jasper is often dipped in petroleum products to bring out color and to seal it. Emerald is oiled; turquoise is waxed. Fake stones: Some dealers will try passing off fake stones instead of natural ones. There are fake stones for most gemstones on the market. Always ask what stone something is if you are not certain. Honest dealers will tell you. If a stone looks too perfect it may be fake, irradiated or dyed. I avoid Laboratory made products are known as synthetics. Tips on buying beads: Good sized holes (so can use a stronger thread) Evenly shaped beads (as appropriate) If the beads are being sold in a 16″ strand — I make sure it is 16″ — not 14″ or 15″ if possible. Look for the best quality stone (if buying real stones) Make sure beads are not cracked or chipped by the holes as this tears the thread Good color (so can create harmonious necklaces and matching...

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